Statement - Dog Attack in Loburn on 25 June

Published: 03-Jul-2019

3 July 2019

Waimakariri District Council have decided to file prosecution with the District Court against the owner of the dogs who were involved in an attack on a runner and her dog in Loburn on 25 June.

The prosecution will focus on the dogs identified as rushing at a person or animal under the Dog Control Act. The remaining dog is to be classified as menacing.

A menacing classification requires a dog to wear a muzzle when in public.

Council would like to thank all parties involved for their help with the investigation.

This type of attack is a rare occurrence in the Waimakariri District and our advice to all dog owners is to have effective control over their animals at all times. If your dog can’t be controlled by your voice or other signal you need to have them on a leash.

We are currently reviewing the Dog Control Bylaw 2004. One objective of the bylaw is to minimise any danger, distress or nuisance from dogs to the community and we’re keen to get feedback from our residents on the Bylaw and the rules around dangerous or menacing dogs.

Submissions are open until 5pm, Friday 26 July 2019 at waimakariri.govt.nz/letstalk


2 July 2019

The Council is investigating a dog attack that took place on Swamp Road, Loburn on the evening of Tuesday 25 June.

A resident was out running with her dog when her animal was attacked initially by two young dogs; shortly afterwards another three dogs joined in. The victim was attacked and badly bitten while trying to protect her pet.

The owner of the attacking dogs immediately got out of his vehicle to try to stop the attack and he was also badly bitten while trying to shield the victim’s dog with his body.

We understand that both dog owners were taken to hospital and received surgery for their injuries, and the dog that was attacked required extensive veterinary care.

The Council was notified that same evening through our after-hours service by both the victim and an ambulance officer who responded to the incident.

We were saddened and deeply disappointed to hear about the attack. We’d like to express our sympathies to the victim and wish both her and the dog a speedy recovery.

We also acknowledge the other dog owner’s actions in trying to stop the attack and remove his dogs from the situation.

This type of attack is a rare occurrence in the Waimakariri District and we’re taking it extremely seriously. Both parties have been identified and are helping our Animal Management team with the investigation.

Four dogs involved in the attack have already been voluntarily destroyed by the owner and we have received evidence to confirm this. We are continuing to investigate the circumstances of the other dog involved.

Currently both parties are recovering from their injuries and a clear picture of the event needs to be established before further action can be made. We’re still investigating and from that options, which include infringements or prosecution, can be decided.

The Waimakariri District has plenty of great public areas for dog walking and we don’t want this sort of incident repeated. Our advice to dog owners is to have effective control over their animals at all times. If a dog can’t be reliably and effectively be controlled by their owner’s voice, they should remain leashed.

If a dog has been classified as dangerous or menacing, they should also be muzzled. In this case, none of the dogs involved were classified as dangerous or menacing.

The Council is currently reviewing the Dog Control Bylaw 2004. One objective of the bylaw is to minimise any danger, distress or nuisance from dogs to the community and we’re keen to get feedback from our residents on the Bylaw and the rules around dangerous or menacing dogs.

Submissions are open until 5pm, Friday 26 July 2019 at waimakariri.govt.nz/letstalk